I recently received several emails with this subject line.  What?  Do people actually open these?  People really think they’ll get free hanky panky without a catch. It reeks of “sent from someone who doesn’t know English well”.    There really is something to that line, “there’s a sucker born every day”.

Of course, I started thinking about the history of spam.  Not the meat, the electronic kind.  Talk about bad publicity for your product.  Hormel is fighting an uphill battle.

So, I researched the history of spam on the Internet.  Turns out, it begins in 1864, yes, 1864.  The spammers been at this a lot longer than you realized.  Scary isn’t it?  Spammers recognized the value of spreading the word to everyone whether they wanted it or not via telegraph.   America didn’t control telegraph content.  There is a downside to no controls.  Of course, they didn’t call it spam then.  No one recorded what they did call it, probably crap, garbage, and many swear words.  Rich people got bombarded daily.  Does this sound familiar?

All the historical records agree the word spam (as applied to the electronic version) originated from a Monty Python skit.  The first electronic spam occurred before the Internet, on the precursor.  It’s now reached gigantic proportions, like 9 billion or more messages are spam, which is more than 75% of emails sent.  Its invaded Facebook , other social media, and smart phones.

Since it’s around since 1864, it must be working.   As long as a good portion of the world on the Internet really believes an attorney from the Congo wants to send them money, we’re stuck with it.

Got a spam story?  I’d love to hear it.

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About kriskkaria

Actress, comedian, voice actor and singer, I voice a weekly podcast called Does This Happen to You. Funny compendium of your day's journey.

8 responses »

  1. WOW! That is very interesting indeed.

  2. nyparrot says:

    Turns out – spam has a history too…. who knew?!:-) Very interesting!

  3. Nice blog … it almost felt like I was reading my own writing … lol. I’ll have to subscribe to your blog …

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